Why posture matters

To most people, “good posture” simply means sitting and standing up straight. Few of us realize the importance of posture to our health and performance. The human body craves alignment. When we are properly aligned, our bones, not our muscles, support our weight, reducing effort and strain.  Bad posture puts stress on the head, neck, low back and spinal cord.

The better we stand, the better we feel.  We feel healthier, have more energy, and move gracefully. So while the word “posture” may conjure up images of book-balancing charm-school girls, it is not just about standing up straight. It’s about being aware of and connected to every part of your self.

Posture  is as important as eating right, exercising, getting proper rest and avoiding potentially harmful substances like alcohol, drugs, and tobacco. Good posture is a way of doing things with more energy, less stress and fatigue. Without good posture, you cannot really be physically fit because our muscles are not working properly so we only get minimum results each time we work out.  Without good posture, you can actually damage your spine every time you exercise and create Osteoarthritis due to lack of proper movement.

Ideally, our bones stack up one upon the other: the head rests directly on top of the spine, which sits directly over the pelvis, which sits directly over the knees and ankles. But if you spend hours every day sitting in a chair, if you hunch forward or balance your weight primarily on one leg, the muscles of your neck and back have to carry the weight of the body rather than it being supported by the spine. The resulting tension and joint pressure can affect you not only physically, but emotionally, too, — from the predictable shoulder and back pain to headaches, short attention span, and depression.

Poor posture distorts the alignment of bones, chronically tenses muscles, and contributes to stressful conditions such as loss of vital lung capacity, increased fatigue, reduced blood and oxygen to the brain, limited range of motion, stiffness of joints, pain syndromes, reduced mental alertness, and decreased productivity at work. According to the Nobel Laureate Dr. Roger Sperry, “the more mechanically distorted a person is, the less energy is available for thinking, metabolism, and healing.”

The most immediate problem with poor posture is that it creates a lot of chronic muscle tension as the weight of the head and upper body must be supported by the muscles instead of the bones. This effect becomes more pronounced the further your posture deviates from your body’s center of balance and the longer you have been misaligned.

To illustrate this idea further, think about carrying a briefcase or heavy box. If you had to carry a this with your arms outstretched in front of you, it would not take long before the muscles of your shoulders would be completely exhausted. This is because carrying the briefcase far away from your center of balance places undue stress on your shoulder muscles. If you held the same briefcase down at your side, your muscles would not fatigue as quickly, because the briefcase is closer to your center of balance and therefore the weight is supported by the bones of the skeleton, rather than the muscles.  Now think of what happens when your neck is pushed out forward from your body or your head is looking down for long periods of time.

In some parts of the world, women can carry big pots full of water from distant water sources back to their homes. They are able to carry these heavy pots a long distance without significant effort because they balance them on the top of their heads, thereby carrying them at their center of balance and allowing the strength of their skeleton to bear the weight, rather than their muscles.

Correcting bad posture and the physical problems that result can be accomplished in two ways. The first is by eliminating as much “bad” stress from your body as possible. Bad stress includes all the factors, habits, or stressors that cause your body to deviate from your structural center. Bad stress can result from a poorly adjusted workstation at work, from not having your seat adjusted correctly in your car, or even from carrying too much weight around in a heavy purse or backpack.

The second is by applying “good” stress on the body in an effort to move your posture back toward your center of balance. This is accomplished through a series of exercises, stretches, adjustments, and changes to your physical environment, all designed to help correct your posture. Getting your body back to its center of balance by improving your posture is critically important to improving how you feel.

Professional Race Car Driver Injuries

 

I see a lot of people post car accident who worry about why they have an injury to the neck after what they think is a low impact car accident.  After reading this research, it is clear that car accidents cause damage, even if you are not a race car driver.  Professional race car drivers have top notch safety features.  Yes, they are going very fast but the cars are specially made for impact and drivers get injured.  Sometimes severely.  So it shouldn’t be a surprise that people driving a “regular” street car get injured when hit by another vehicle.

The following data is from an investigation regarding injuries during and after races between 1996 and 2000.  The results  were recorded through medical charts from the circuit medical centre at Fuji Speedway (one of  the largest circuits in Japan).  Race car drivers were from single seat/formula cars or saloon  cars.

Results: Data was obtained from 39 races in single seat cars (1030 participating cars) and 42 races in saloon  cars (1577 cars).

50 injuries were recorded during the single seat car races, and 62 during the saloon car races (injury rate 1.2 per  1000 competitors per race and 0.9 per 1000 competitors per race respectively). Thirteen injuries were recorded  after the race, 12 of them in saloon car racing. Bruises were the major injury in single seat car racing (58%). Lower limb bruising was more common than upper limb bruising. Most of the injuries in saloon car racing (53.2%) were neck sprains. The incidence of concussion was high in both groups compared with other high risk sports.

Conclusions: There were some differences in injuries between the two types of car. No serious injuries occurred except for one death. However, the driver’s body is subjected to large forces in a crash, hence the high incidence of concussion. The injuries recorded after the race emphasize that motor racing is a demanding sport.

Racing drivers are exposed to high risk situations such as car crashes. However, it is not clear exactly how much G force is loaded on the driver’s body in such situations. Because the driver’s muscles resist the G force in an actual crash, the G force loaded on the body may be smaller than that recorded by the car telemeters. Forces that cause severe injuries, such as concussions and fractures, are around 5–10 G, which are produced by acute deceleration of about 150–200 km/h.

Moreover, racing requires extraordinary physical performance in extreme conditions such as the high G forces caused by breaking and cornering, heavy steering, and high temperature. In addition, it is said that the heart rate increases up to 170–180 beats/min during cornering.1

Thus motor sport is highly risky and demanding, and injuries are recorded both during and after races. The purpose of this research was to draw attention to motor sport by investigating injuries of racing drivers and to present a profile of those injuries.

METHODS

Injuries recorded during and after races held at Fuji Speedway, which is one of the biggest circuits in Japan, between 1996 and 2000 were investigated retrospectively by using medical charts from the circuit medical centre. All drivers involved in crashes during the race were sent to the medical centre to be checked by a doctor, even if they did not complain of any symptoms; therefore no in-race injuries were overlooked. Some drivers may have gone directly to hospital, so some post-race injuries may have been missed.

The diagnoses of injured drivers who needed further examination at a hospital were recorded at the medical centre. Therefore, all injuries that were checked were recorded.

Neck pain resulting only from injured soft tissue was recorded as a neck sprain. Drivers who experienced either confusion or amnesia after the crash were diagnosed as having concussion. No driver lost consciousness as the result of a crash.

Two types of race were investigated, single seat/formula cars and saloon cars, as it was hypothesized that the difference in car design would result in different injuries. Only the main races involving professional drivers were selected for research, because the accident rate may be different between novice and professional drivers. During the five year study period, there were few changes in regulations on racing cars. This means that the type and incidence of injuries did not differ very much during these five years.

Injuries in single seat and saloon car racing showed that neck sprains and bruises were the most common in both types of car. All injuries to the neck were sprains. Therefore, in the analysis of injury type, neck sprains were not included in the sprains category, but were treated as a separate injury.

 

  Single seat car racing

The number of participating cars was 1030, in 39 races. Fifty injuries      (including one death) were recorded during the races and one afterwards.  The in-race injury rate was approximately 1.2 per 1000 competitors per  race.

Bruises made up 58% of the injuries, and neck sprains accounted for  34%. The other four injuries were: ankle sprain, abrasion, concussion,  and death. The death occurred when the car hit the sign board, which  stands at the start line, after being sent airborne when its tyre hit that of  another car in the straight section of the circuit. The cause of death was  recorded as cerebral contusion. The car may have hit the finishing gate  directly at more than 200 km/h because the gravel prevented effective  deceleration, so the death may have been instantaneous. Therefore, the  death was considered an isolated injury and was not included in the  analysis of site of injury. One driver with concussion was sent to hospital,  but there were no significant findings on computed tomography scan.

Analysis of the injured body sites showed that most injuries were to the neck 34%. The next most injured body sites were the lower limbs 24%; 11 of these 12 injuries were bruises and the other was an ankle sprain. The number of injuries to the upper limbs was smaller 14%. Six of these seven injuries were also bruises, and the other one was an abrasion. Head/face injuries accounted for 10%; four of these injuries were bruises to the head, and one was a concussion. This shows that the head was prone to hard impacts even though helmets were worn.

One driver seen at the medical centre after the race complained of pain in both forearms. This was thought to be compartment syndrome, but he had no nervous symptoms.

 Saloon car racing

The number of participating cars was 1577, in 42 races. There were 62 injuries recorded during the race and 12  afterwards. The in-race injury rate accounted for approximately 0.9 per 1000 competitors per race.

Most of the in-race injuries were neck sprains 53%. Bruises accounted for 27%; this was much less than in single  seat car racing. There were five fractures; these were diagnosed at the hospital. Three were tibial, one was an L1  burst fracture, and another was a Bennett fracture. The rest of the injuries were concussion, sprain, and  abrasion. Two drivers who had concussion were also sent to the hospital; there were no significant findings on  computed tomography scan.

The neck was the most commonly injured body site 53%. The next most common site of injury was the upper limbs 21%, more than lower limb injuries, which accounted for 16%. Head/face injuries accounted for 5%; two of these were concussions and one was a face abrasion. The abrasion may have occurred because the helmet rubbed against the face when it shifted during impact.

More injuries were recorded after the race than for single seat cars. Four of the 12 “injuries” were dehydration. One driver had a stomach ache, and the other seven cases were Orthopaedic problems. Two of the latter were right shoulder pain, and the drivers could not lift their arms.

DISCUSSION

There are some difficulties in analyzing the incidence of injuries among racing drivers, because the conditions of each race are not always the same. The number of participating cars can vary from race to race. As the number of cars increases, more accidents are likely to occur. Also, the speed is different in each category—accidents with faster cars may be more common and severe than with slower cars. Therefore the injury incidence can differ from race to race. These factors which are specific to motor sport make analysis difficult.

We selected races involving professional drivers only because there may be a difference between incidents involving novice drivers and those involving professional drivers. Furthermore, the racing cars used in professional categories are faster. In addition, we investigated two different types of car, saloon and single seat, hypothesizing that the difference in car design would affect the injury profile. The main differences are: (a) the saloon car has a roof—that is, the cockpit is an enclosed space—but the single seat car is open; (b) the cockpit of the single seat car is cramped, especially with regard to leg room. In contrast, the cockpit of the saloon car is relatively spacious.

Bruises accounted for 27% of the injuries in saloon car racing, whereas bruises accounted for 58% of the injuries in single seat car racing. Analysis of the body sites where bruises occurred in the two groups showed that lower limb injuries were more common in single seat car racing, and upper limb injuries were more common in saloon car racing. This can be explained by the lack of leg room in single seat cars.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration of the United States investigates traffic accidents, using the National Accident Sampling System Crashworthiness Data System (CDS). Their data for car accidents between 1988 and 1989 show that injuries to the arms are more common than to the legs.  This is the same as our data on saloon cars, the design of which is based on ordinary cars. In our research, neck injuries accounted for 53% and head/face injuries 5% of the total in saloon cars. In single seat cars, the corresponding percentages were 34% and 10%. The distance to the steering wheel is short in single seat cars compared with saloon cars, so drivers are susceptible to hitting their head/face on the steering wheel when they crash. This may explain the higher head/face injury rate. The chances of hitting the steering wheel may be low in saloon car racing, but tension forces on the neck may be higher when the head has to stop without hitting something. Therefore the neck injury rate in saloon car racing is high. The head/face injury rate was not high in either group compared with CDS data (39%), and all injuries were classified as abbreviated injury scale (AIS) 1, which is produced by the Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine (table 2).This is because racing drivers are restrained by six point seat belts, and helmets protect their heads.

 

The percentage of neck injuries was high in both groups, but there were no serious injuries such as fractures or dislocations, and all neck injuries were sprains classified as AIS 1. This may be because the driver’s neck does not encounter excessive pure tensile, tension-extension, and lateral bending loading. It has been suggested that pure tensile loading on the neck without any other force must exceed 100 G to produce severe neck injuries.  Such a G force is not likely to occur in most crashes. Furthermore, even though the driver hits his head somewhere in the cockpit, the neck may not encounter traumatic tension-extension and lateral bending loading. This is because the six point seatbelt restrains the body from moving too much when the car crashes, and thus the head does not strike the front with excessive force, which may produce tension-extension injury. Moreover, the headrest of the bucket seat used in the saloon car and the design of the single seat car, which protects the sides and back of the head, also prevent tension-extension and lateral bending loading.

Two out of three head/face injuries in saloon cars and one out of six head/face injuries in single seat cars were concussions. The three patients with concussions had amnesia or confusion, but no loss of consciousness. This incidence of concussion is approximately 1.3 per 1000 drivers in saloon car racing (which is a rate of about 4.8% per race) and approximately 1.0 per 1000 drivers in single seat car racing (which is a rate of about 2.6% per race). In soccer, which has a comparably high incidence of concussion to American football, the rate of concussion is 0.15–0.34 per 1000 athlete exposures (estimated rates are about 1–2% per season for a typical female or male collegiate soccer player).This shows that motor racing has a high rate of concussion compared with other high risk sports, even though drivers are protected by seat belts and helmets.

What is already known

Racing drivers are known to suffer various disorders; low back pain is typical. Injuries are known to occur in motor sport, but there are few data on the injuries specific to this sport

What this study adds

Injuries to racing drivers during and after the race were investigated. A difference was found between injuries in single seat and saloon car racing. Neck injuries were not severe, but the concussion rate was higher than in other sports.

There is now a device to prevent head and neck injuries called the head and neck support (HANS). This is designed to reduce movement of the driver’s head in a crash and thereby the force on the neck. In our research, there were no fatal neck injuries, but many neck sprains. This device may prevent such neck injuries and may also decrease head injuries. It is not certain how concussions occur when racing cars crash. It may be the result of hitting the head against something in the cockpit or the result of the sudden acceleration of the head. HANS restricts head movement through tethers attached to the driver’s helmet, therefore it may cause the head to stop suddenly during a crash. We are concerned that such an abrupt deceleration may result in traumatic force on the brain.

 

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Can I Still Be Hurt after a car accident when there is little damage to my car?

In a study conducted by Charles Carroll, M.D., Paul McAtee, M.D. and Lee Riley, M.D. revealed that: “The amount of damage to the automobile bears little relation to the force applied to the cervical spine (neck) of the occupants.”

A vehicle weighs a ton and you are very small in comparison.  So even with little impact, just the weight of the mass can cause damage.  Think of being tackled on the street by a 200lb. person and you can imagine being hurt right?  Well, a car weighs way more than that and even though you are strapped in and have airbags, it is still a large mass that has slammed into you.  This causes damage.

Like I mentioned earlier, the damage to a car is different to the damage to a person.   Even though your body may work like a machine, it is not and it can lead to pain and issues with how your body works.  Even if there is no pain immediately, the impact can lead to pain later on.

Please give our Redwood City Chiropractic office a call at (650) 353-1133 so we can evaluate you using our technology that has been used by cardiologists and personal trainers on professional athletes and astronauts.  It tracks your body during your care and tells us how you are healing.

Fantasy Football, Posture & Food

We all love fantasy football.  Now instead of one day of football we get three days a week!  That is great, but what that can lead to is eating junk, slouching on the couch for hours and enduring hours of stress hoping our player or team is gonna do well.

Please be mindful of posture during the games.  Slouching can lead to headaches, neck pain, shoulder pain and low back pain to name a few.  A good thing to do is sit on a rolled up towel and put it right under your lower hip bone called your Ishial Tuberosity.  Make sure that you position it so your back is not slouched and it is easy for you to sit with good posture without forcing your back upright.  This will help you prevent postural issues that may come up after sitting for hours watching the game.

Now the other problem…food.  Here are a couple of dishes that can help you fill up and keep you healthy as well.

There are tons of vegetarian dishes out there online to help you eat healthier but for those of you who like meat and need something hot to fill you up during the game here are some tips:

1. Butternut Bacon Squash

2 1/2 lbs butternut squash
15 slices of bacon
Olive oil
Chili powder
Garlic powder
Salt
PepperPreheat the oven to 350 F.  Peel and trim the butternut squash.  Cut the squash into 1″ cubes (discard the seeds and pulp–makes about 30 cubes).  Place the squash in a bowl and drizzle with oil and sprinkle with chili powder, garlic powder, salt, and pepper–to taste.  Toss to coat.  Cut the bacon in half, width wise.  Wrap half a bacon slice around one squash cube and place, seal side down on a foil lined baking sheet.  Repeat for the reminder of the squash cubes.  Bake for 20 minutes.  Flip the bites over (careful not to unwrap the bacon) and bake for another 20 minutes or until the squash is tender and the bacon is cooked through.  If you want to bacon crispier, broil it for the last 3-5 minutes of baking (keep an eye on it).*You could also use toothpicks to seal the bacon, if necessary
2. Buffalo Egg Chicken Muffins
8 Eggs
6 oz. Chicken – Cooked and Chopped
¼ Cup Blue Cheese Crumbles
3 Tbs. Buffalo Wing Sauce
2 Green Onions – Chopped
1 Rib Celery – Chopped
1 Clove Garlic – Minced
Sea Salt and Pepper – To Taste

(2 Tbs. Peace and Love)

DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 350° Lightly oil a muffin tin.

In a large mixing bowl, fork whisk eggs.  To the eggs, add chicken, blue cheese crumbles, buffalo wing sauce, green onions, celery, garlic, sea salt and pepper.  Mix until all ingredients are well incorporated.

Pour mixture into muffin tin.  This should be enough to fill 8 spots.

Bake 20 minutes or until fluffy and golden brown on top.

Prep Time – 15 Minutes
Cook Time – 20 Minutes

Makes Servings: 4
This will not only be different than most party foods served but will help you eat healthier than chips and dip.
References:

Top 20 Paleo Super Bowl Recipes

 

Inventor Of MRI Has Found Possible Cause For Multiple Sclerosis

A noteworthy press release was sent out last fall that talks about the possible etiology of MS, including an eight-subject trial run at a non-invasive treatment.

If you have had a car accident, whiplash injury or head trauma from some other cause, there may be a lot more going on than you may know. According to the study, head trauma like that seen in whiplash injuries causes obstruction of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) thus increasing the pressure in the ventricles and leaking into the brain. This has become more visible on the new FONAR Upright MRI than the traditional lie-down-in-the-tube MRI.

The obstruction comes as the first few bones in your neck becomes misaligned and causes a backup of CSF. When this misalignment was corrected, the study shows pressure decreases by 28.6%! The flow also becomes uniform again once treatment is given. The idea of the fluid (CSF and blood) collecting in the brain due to the poor draining and improper position of these vertebrae is under review for a cause of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease as well.

You might think that because the CSF and other vessels are deep in the brain that surgery is required. Au contraire says Dr. Scott Rosa. Dr. Rosa preforms an upper cervical chiropractic technique called Atlas Orthogonal that corrects the malposition of the cervical spine without surgery or drugs. Did you hear that?! NO DRUGS! No prescription and no side effects. No cutting, scarring and recovering. This procedure alone is enough to allow CSF and blood flow to normalize and decrease the pressure that will diminish the risk of the person from developing MS. That is as long as draining remains clear.

Everybody knows that neck injuries present with varying degrees of severity. How long after an injury does it take to develop into a condition like MS? On average, the study showed an 11 year lap between the initial injury and the diagnosis of MS. That should change the way we understand and treat vehicle accidents, sport injuries and other injuries to the head and neck. There are growing numbers of studies and theories relating to decrease flow of CSF and venous blood from the brain.

Reference: Dr. Flanagan uprightdoctor.wordpress.com
http://ucstudies.wordpress.com/2012/01/15/inventor-of-mri-has-found-possible-cause-of-multiple-sclerosis/

Some Jobs Are More At Risk For Back Problems

An article from the October 7, 2006 BBC News in the United Kingdom reports on a survey study listing the 5 top jobs most likely to cause back issues among workers in the United Kingdom. The list, compiled and published by the British Chiropractic Association (BCA) has some surprising findings. The study conducted by the BCA surveyed 2,374 people, found that 59% of the working population, in the top category at risk for back problems, sit down all day. Many of these people do not leave their desks even for a lunch break. This sedentary lifestyle coupled with positioning and long hours puts office workers at a higher risk than the excessive lifting and carrying done by those employed in manual jobs. The top five list as released by the British Chiropractic Association is as follows:

1. Office Worker – Long periods of time sitting in awkward positions, often slouched over computer keyboards, or maybe sitting at chairs not properly adjusted for their needs.

2. Nurse – Long shifts, often on their feet all day as well as lifting and carrying.

3. Driver – Hours a day spent at the wheel, sitting in a poor position, along with limited movement.

4. Laborer – Repeated strain from lifting heavy weights and often twisting in awkward positions.

5. Teacher & Nursery Staff – Continuously bending down to a child’s height and lifting children can cause back problems Dr. Tim Hutchful speaking for the BCA comments: “This survey has highlighted what we chiropractors have known for some time. Lack of exercise and sedentary lifestyle is taking its toll. It is assumed that those most at risk from back pain are the ones who have very physical jobs however, as this research has unveiled, whilst lifting and carrying are still common triggers for back pain, it is those with less physically demanding jobs and who are often seated for the majority of the day that could be most prone to back problems.”

According to the BCA, one third of UK citizens will suffer from some sort of back problem. Dr. Hutchful added: “For many who work in an office environment, it is the day-to-day, mundane routines that are at the root of most back problems. Hunching over computer keyboards and cradling the phone between the ear and shoulder can all contribute to lower back and neck stiffness, not to mention the fact that many office workers sit for hours at a time with very little movement.”

References: www.chiropracticresearch.org

Forward Head Posture Can Cause Headaches

It is very common for patients to come into my office with headaches and stress on their neck.  This isn’t much of a surprise since most people work at a desk with a computer, have a laptop that they use at home and text on their phone.  All of these actions cause the head to move forward.

According to Kapandji (Physiology of the joints, volume III), for every inch your head moves forwards, it gains 10 pounds in weight, as far as the muscles in your upper back and neck are concerned, because they have to work that much harder to keep the head (chin) from dropping onto your chest.   This also forces the suboccipital muscles (they raise the chin) to remain in constant contraction, putting pressure on the 3 Suboccipital nerves.   This nerve compression may cause headaches at the base of the skull. Pressure on the suboccipital nerves can also mimic sinus (frontal) headaches.

Rene Cailliet M.D., famous medical author and former director of the department of physical medicine and rehabilitation at the University of Southern California states:

Head in forward posture can add up to thirty pounds of abnormal leverage on the cervical spine. This can pull the entire spine out of alignment. Forward head posture (FHP) may result in the loss of 30% of vital lung capacity. These breath-related effects are primarily due to the loss of the cervical lordosis, which blocks the action of the hyoid muscles, especially the inferior hyoid responsible for helping lift the first rib during inhalation.”

Persistent forward head posture (a.k.a. “hyperkyphotic posture”) puts compressive loads upon the upper thoracic vertebra, and is also associated with the development of Upper Thoracic Hump, which can devolve into Dowager Hump when the vertebra develop compression fractures (anterior wedging).  A recent study found this hyperkyphotic posture associated with a 1.44 rate of mortality. 

It’s not uncommon to observe 2″ of anterior head placement in new patients.   Would you be surprised that your neck and shoulders hurt if you had a 20-pound watermelon hanging around your neck?   That’s what forward head posture can do to you.   Left uncorrected, FHP will continue to decline.   Chiropractic can be very corrective, especially in the hands of a chiropractic rehabilitationist.   Our specialty is in reversing the joint fixations (what we refer to as “subluxations”) and in re-invigorating the muscles that normally retract the head.

http://www.chiro.org/LINKS/Forward_Head_Posture.shtml

Study Of Future Neck Pain After A Car Accident

FROM: European Spine Journal 2010 (Jun);   19 (6):   972–981

Paul S. Nolet, Pierre Côté, J. David Cassidy and Linda J. Carroll

Centre of Research Expertise in Improved Disability Outcomes (CREIDO), University Health Network Rehabilitation Solutions, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Canada
Paul S. Nolet, 86 Dawson Road, Unit 3, Guelph, ON N1H 1A8, Canada e-mail: [email protected]; [email protected]

The Association Between a Lifetime History of a Neck Injury
in a Motor Vehicle Collision and Future Neck Pain:
A Population-based Cohort Study

This section is compiled by Frank M. Painter, D.C.

The objective of this population-based cohort study was to investigate the association between a lifetime history of neck injury from a motor vehicle collision and the development of troublesome neck pain. The current evidence suggests that individuals with a history of neck injury in a traffic collision are more likely to experience future neck pain. However, these results may suffer from residual confounding. Therefore, there is a need to test this association in a large population-based cohort with adequate control of known confounders. We formed a cohort of 919 randomly sampled Saskatchewan adults with no or mild neck pain in September 1995. At baseline, participants were asked if they ever injured their neck in a motor vehicle collision. Six and twelve months later, we asked about the presence of troublesome neck pain (grade II–IV) on the chronic pain grade questionnaire. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate the association between a lifetime history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and the onset of troublesome neck pain while controlling for known confounders. The follow-up rate was 73.5% (676/919) at 6 months and 63.1% (580/919) at 1 year. We found a positive association between a history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and the onset of troublesome neck pain after controlling for bodily pain and body mass index (adjusted HRR = 2.14; 95% CI 1.12–4.10). Our analysis suggests that a history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision is a risk factor for developing future troublesome neck pain. The consequences of a neck injury in a motor vehicle collision can have long lasting effects and predispose individuals to experience recurrent episodes of neck pain.

Dr Amie Gregory thoughts and advice:

It is very important to get treated immediately after a car accident.  Most people rest afterward which is not the best way to go about it.  Soft tissue takes from 8-12 weeks to be rehabilitated and if rested after an injury, the tissue will become more taut and make it harder to move resulting in longer rehabilitation and more injuries.  If it is contradicted to adjust your neck or back after an accident, we can still work on the soft tissue and keep proper movement in your body preventing injuries and get you well quicker!

Sometimes Chiropractic Can Be Life Changing!

Appearing in the March 2004 issue of the peer-reviewed Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, was a documented case study of a life changing case. Here is what that article stated:

The subject of the study was a previously healthy 17 year old who was involved in high school sports.
On one occasion he was competing as a pole vaulter in a high school track meet when he had an accident in which he landed on his head from a height of 10 feet.

Immediately following the accident, he noticed neck pain at the base of his skull. In addition he started suffering from back pain and daily migraine headaches approximately 3 times per week. He described his pain as an “unbearable everyday occurrence.” Additionally, several days after the accident he began experiencing “blackouts,” which were later diagnosed as petit mal seizures. These seizures continued to increase until he was experiencing them 4 times per day.

Things continued to get worse for him during the first 6 months following the accident, he started experiencing the onset of depression. He described a complete loss of appetite, extreme lethargy, a lack of concern for himself, and an extremely erratic sleep cycle that often left him awake for several days followed by periods of 14 to 18 hours of sleep.

He and his mother stated that he consulted with approximately 24 practitioners during this time. Prescribed medications and therapies did not alleviate or reduce symptoms. To alleviate his pain and depression, he started using illegal drugs in an attempt to “make himself feel better.” After becoming addicted, his parents checked him into a drug rehabilitation program, which he completed.

It was after this long 6 year period, he sought chiropractic care from a chiropractor. An examination was performed and it was determined that the young man was suffering due to a subluxation in the upper neck. A course of corrective adjustments was begun to correct the subluxation and reduce nerve pressure.

The results as reported in the Journal was nothing short of life changing for the young man. After 1 month of care, the patient reported an absence of seizures and manic episodes and improved sleep patterns. After 4 months of care, seizures and manic episodes remained absent and migraine headaches were reduced from 3 per week to 2 per month. After 7 months of care, the patient reported the complete absence of symptoms. And eighteen months later, the patient remains asymptomatic. Needless to say, his life was changed!

This is why we love our job 🙂

If you want to be healthy and have your body work efficiently, give our Redwood City Chiropractic office a call!

Whiplash Can Help With Chiropractic Care

In an article published in the Journal of Orthopedic Medicine in 1999, they pointed out the superiority of chiropractic care for patients suffering from long term whiplash.

The authors of the article noted that a previous study had shown that 26 of 28 patients, or 93 percent, of patients with chronic whiplash benefited from chiropractic care.

In the authors own study, they interviewed 100 consecutive chiropractic referrals of patients with chronic whiplash. Their results also showed that of the 93 patients who remained in the study, 69 of them, or 74 percent, found improvement. The researchers concluded their opening comments with the statement, “The results from this study provide further evidence that chiropractic is an effective treatment for chronic whiplash symptoms.”