Animal Therapy Is More Popular At Hospitals

For those of you who may not know, animal visits at hospitals lower blood pressure and help reduce stress during a hospital stay.  Here is a great article I f0und online.  A year and a half ago, Ruth London lay in intensive care in a hospital in Boca Raton, Fla., with severe pneumonia, delirious and hallucinating that she was in jail.

With the permission of a doctor on the unit, Ernest London, 81, cooked up a plan. He would bring the family dog, Delilah, a fluffy white Maltese, to see if the pet could calm his wife down.

At the entrance of the hospital, Mr. London was met by volunteers who stopped him cold. No dogs from home are allowed, they told him. But a call to the doctor was made, and eventually Mr. London and Delilah were allowed to go upstairs.

In the hospital room, the dog ran to Mrs. London’s side and nuzzled her hand. She stirred from her delirium “just a little bit,” Mr. London recalled, and began to remember where she was. “It was a turning point,” he said. “From that point on, she seemed to take a turn for the better.”

“I love that dog. I love her so much,” said Mrs. London, now 74.

It was a one-time deal: after a hurried meeting, hospital staff members decided they wouldn’t allow Delilah to come again, nor would they let other family members bring family pets to see other patients, Mr. London said.

That’s the policy at most hospitals across the country.

But a few medical institutions have taken a different approach and thrown open their doors to patients’ own dogs and cats, letting them visit along with spouses, children and friends. (Lots of hospitals have pet therapy programs using trained dogs, but that’s a different matter.)

 

The University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore lets family pets visit their owners, so long as certain requirements are met, as does the University of Iowa Hospital and Clinics in Iowa City; Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center in Richmond; Rush University Medical Center in Chicago; two hospitals associated with the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.; and more than a dozen other medical centers.

On Long Island, North Shore University Hospital allows personal pets to stay with patients around the clock in its 10-bed palliative care unit, as does Hospice Inn, a freestanding 18-bed hospice facility that’s part of North Shore-LIJ Health System.

Policies vary at the institutions that allow visits by patients’ pets, but many share some of the same requirements. A doctor’s order allowing the family pet to visit is typically necessary, as is an attestation from a veterinarian that the animal is healthy and up to date on all its shots. Most institutions require that dogs — the most common visitors, by far — be groomed within a day or so of a visit and on a leash when they walk through hospital corridors. Cats must be taken in and out of the institution in a carrier.

If a dog or cat wants to get up on a patient’s bed, a covering is laid down first. If an animal seems agitated or distressed when it comes into the hospital, staff members who meet the family and escort them to the patient’s room have the right to turn it away. If the patient shares a room with someone, that person must agree before a pet may visit.

“We have not had any problems,” said the Rev. Susan Roy, director of pastoral care services at the University of Maryland Medical Center, whose “your pet can visit” policy has been in place since 2008. If anything, she said, the visits can be hard on dogs, who often respond viscerally to an owner’s illness and may take a day or two to recover from a visit.

Rush University Medical Center spent three years studying the issue before its new pet visitation policy went into effect in February. Diane Gallagher, the hospital’s associate vice president of nursing operations, described some of the questions: Would animals transmit infections to patients, or vice versa? What were the liability issues? Could allowing pets to visit interfere with patient care — if, for instance, a family dog became alarmed and protective of the sick person when a doctor, a nurse or a technician came into the room?

In the end, officials decided that the benefits — comfort and reduced stress for patients — were more substantial than the risks.

Although research has shown that hospital therapy dogs can pick up germs and potentially transmit bacteria that can cause dangerous infections, those animals typically wander from room to room, while people’s own pets are expected to stay with the patient they are visiting. If someone has an open wound or an active infection, a visit from a family pet is discouraged, according to most hospital policies.

Research on the value of personal pets visiting patients in the hospital hasn’t been done. One small 2010 study of 10 healthy dog owners by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth’s Center for Human-Animal Interaction found that both unfamiliar and familiar dogs provoked similar reactions: a relaxation response and reduction in blood pressure and levels of cortisol, a stress-related hormone, according to Dr. Sandra Barker, director of the center and a professor of psychiatry.

But personal anecdotes abound. Anne Mahler, 57, a clinical nurse specialist at Hebrew SeniorLife, the largest provider of elder care services in the Boston area, remembers how depressed her elderly father was after breaking a hip and trying to recover in a rehabilitation facility. That institution wouldn’t allow his beloved dog Molly, a springer spaniel, to come to his room, but a visit was arranged in a back room off the lobby.

“My dad sat there sobbing,” Ms. Mahler said. Afterwards, the older man began eating more regularly, his attitude lightened, and he seemed determined to do everything possible to return home to join Molly.

More than 400 seniors live on the long-term care unit at Hebrew SeniorLife’s Roslindale campus, and staff members strongly encourage pet visits, Ms. Mahler said.

Harry Grandis fought off bladder cancer for seven years before finally succumbing to the illness last October at the age of 91. The final year of his life he was hospitalized five times at Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, and during two of those stays had regular visits from Minnie, his beloved Yorkshire Terrier.

“Minnie would come into Harry’s room and his eyes would light up,” said Ann Grandis, his widow. “It was like bringing home to him. It just made such a difference.”

Harry returned home to die, and on the last day of his life Minnie lay in bed at his side until close to the end. Now it’s Ann who relies on Minnie and would want her there if anything untoward were to happen. “I would be lost without her,” Ms. Grandi, 70, said. “She’s family.”

References: When Best Friends Can Visit: http://newoldage.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/04/10/when-best-friends-can-visit/

Is Laughing Exercise?

Is laughter a kind of exercise? That offbeat question is at the heart of a new study of laughing and pain that emphasizes how unexpectedly entwined our bodies and emotions can be.

For the study, which was published this year in Proceedings of the Royal Society B,  researchers at Oxford University recruited a large group of undergraduate men and women.

They then set out to make their volunteers laugh.

Most of us probably think of laughter, if we think of it at all, as a response to something funny — as, in effect, an emotion.

But laughter is fundamentally a physical action. “Laughter involves the repeated, forceful exhalation of breath from the lungs,” says Robin Dunbar, a professor of evolutionary psychology at Oxford, who led the study. “The muscles of the diaphragm have to work very hard.” We’ve all heard the phrase “laugh until it hurts,” he points out. That pain isn’t metaphoric; prolonged laughing can be painful and exhausting.

Rather like a difficult workout.

But does laughter elicit a physiological response similar to that of exercise and, if so, what might that reveal about the nature of exertion?

To find out, Dr. Dunbar and his colleagues had their volunteers watch, both alone and as part of a group, a series of short videos that were either comic or dryly factual documentaries.

But first, the volunteers submitted to a test of their pain threshold, as determined by how long they could tolerate a tightening blood pressure cuff or a frozen cooling sleeve.

The decision to introduce pain into this otherwise fun-loving study stems from one of the more well-established effects of strenuous exercise: that it causes the body to release endorphins, or natural opiates. Endorphins are known “to play a crucial role in the management of pain,” the study authors write, and, like other opiates, to induce a feeling of euphoric calm and well-being (they are believed to play a role in “runner’s high”).

It’s difficult to study endorphin production directly, however, since much of the action takes place within the working brain and requires a lumbar puncture to monitor, Dr. Dunbar says. That is not a procedure volunteers willingly undergo, particularly in a study about laughing. Instead, he and his colleagues turned to pain thresholds, an indirect but generally accepted marker of endorphin production. If someone’s pain threshold rises, he or she is presumed to be awash in the natural analgesics.

And in Dr. Dunbar’s experiments, pain thresholds did go up after people watched the funny videos, but not after they viewed the factual documentaries.

The only difference between the two experiences was that in one, people laughed, a physical reaction that the scientists quantified with audio monitors. They could hear their volunteers belly-laughing. Their abdominal muscles were contracting. Their endorphin levels were increasing in response, and both their pain thresholds and their general sense of amiable enjoyment were on the rise.

In other words, it was the physical act of laughing, the contracting of muscles and resulting biochemical reactions, that prompted, at least in part, the pleasure of watching the comedy. Or, as Dr. Dunbar and his colleagues write, “the sense of heightened affect in this context probably derives from the way laughter triggers endorphin uptake.”

The physical act of laughing contributed to the emotional response of finding something to be funny.

Why the interplay of endorphins and laughing should be of interest to those of us who exercise may not be immediately obvious. But as Dr. Dunbar points out, what happens during one type of physical exertion probably happens in others. Laughter is an intensely infectious activity. In this study, people laughed more readily and lustily when they watched the comic videos as a group than when they watched them individually, and their pain thresholds, concomitantly, rose higher after group viewing.

Something similar may happen when people exercise together, Dr. Dunbar says. In an experiment from 2009, he and his colleagues studied a group of elite Oxford rowers, asking them to work out either on isolated rowing machines, separated from one another in a gym, or on a machine that simulated full, synchronized crew rowing. In that case, the rowers were exerting themselves in synchrony, as a united group.

After they exercised together, the rowers’ pain thresholds — and presumably their endorphin levels — were significantly higher than they had been at the start, but also higher than when they rowed alone.

“We don’t know why synchrony has this effect, but it seems very strong,” Dr. Dunbar says.

So if you typically run or bike alone, perhaps consider finding a partner. Your endorphin response might rise and, at least theoretically, render that unpleasant final hill a bit less daunting. Or if you prefer exercising alone, perhaps occasionally entertain yourself with a good joke.

But don’t expect forced laughter to lend you an edge, Dr. Dunbar says. “Polite titters do not involve the repeated, uninhibited series of exhalations” that are needed to “drive the endorphin effect,” he says. With laughter, as with exercise, it seems, there really is no gain without some element of pain.

References: Article by Gretchen Reynolds of the New York Times on the science of fitness.

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/10/24/laughter-as-a-form-of-exercise/?ref=health

Tips For Next Years Holiday Season

We all know how important it is to keep yourself as stress free as possible during the holiday season.  The stress of holiday candies, dinners, celebrations and travel can take a toll.   Make sure to eat right, drink plenty of water, stretch, exercise and take a few minutes to slow down take some deep breaths and relax.

The ACA and Precise Moves Chiropractic have some tips to keeping you healthy and limit stress during the holiday season: 

Treat Holiday Shopping As An Athletic Event

  • Stay hydrated! Drink eight to ten 8-ounce glasses of water a day. (Coffee, tea, soft drinks and alcohol are dehydrators. Don’t substitute them for water.) On shopping days, you may need to drink even more water.
  • Be sure to stretch before and after a long day of shopping or taking those returns back. When you are stressed-out, your muscles are less flexible than usual.
  • Wear shoes with plenty of cushioning in the soles to absorb the impact of walking on those hard shopping mall floors.
  • Make sure your clothing is as comfortable as possible. It’s a good idea to wear layers, because you may be going from a cold environment (outdoors) to a warm environment (indoors).
  • Leave your purse at home. Wear a light fanny pack, or if necessary, a light backpack instead. Pack only those items that are absolutely essential (driver’s license, credit card, etc.).
  • If you start to feel some pain, nip it in the bud. Apply an ice bag to the affected area for 20 minutes, then take it off for a couple of hours. Repeat a couple of times each day over the next day or two.

Plan Frequent Breaks Into Your Shopping Day

  • During a day of heavy shopping, most people should take a break every 45 minutes. Those with less stamina may even need to take breaks more frequently.
  • If possible, obtain a locker. Lockers can help cut down dramatically on how much you have to carry around. You can take a load off by scheduling trips to your locker into your breaks.
  • If your mall or shopping center doesn’t offer lockers, try to plan trips to your car. Don’t carry around more than is absolutely necessary at one time.
  • When taking breaks, try to eat light foods. A salad and some fruit is a much better option than a burger and fries.
  • Skip the coffee break! Coffee and sodas contain caffeine and sugar, which add even more stress to your body. Pass on the designer coffee at the java stand and keep drinking water.

Shopping With Children

  • If at all possible, DO NOT bring children along on a holiday shopping trip. Most children simply do not have the stamina for such an event, and you and your child will only become frustrated with one another. Don’t add this type of stress to an already stressful situation.
  • Try to split “child duty” up with a spouse or another parent. They’ll watch your kids while you shop, and vice-versa.

Wrapping Your Gifts

  • Since there is no “ideal” position for wrapping gifts, the most important thing to remember is to vary your positions. For example, try standing at a table or countertop for one package, sitting on a bed for another, sitting in a comfortable chair for another, etc.
  • Do not wrap packages while sitting on the floor. Wrapping packages while sitting on a hard floor can wreak havoc on your posture, and should be avoided.
  • Always stretch before and after you wrap gifts.

“When wrapping presents, it’s a good idea to ‘stretch the opposites,'” says Dr. Bautch. “In other words, if you are leaning forward when wrapping your gifts, stretch backward when you are done.”

Chiropractic Care Can Help
If you experience pain or discomfort as a result of holiday shopping, consider calling us for a visit. We can help alleviate your pain naturally, so you can enjoy the holiday season as it was meant to be.

Hope your holidays were wonderful and have a prosperous New Year!

References: http://www.acatoday.org/content_css.cfm?CID=74

Life Changing Success Stories Of Chiropractic

Chiropractic Life-Changing Success Story Documented

Appearing in the March 2004 issue of the peer-reviewed Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, was a documented case study of a life changing case. The subject of the study was a previously healthy 17 year old who was involved in high school sports.

On one particular occasion he was competing as a pole vaulter in a high school track meet when he had an accident in which he landed on his head from a height of 10 feet.

Immediately following the accident, the young man noticed the onset of neck pain focused at the base of his skull. In addition he started suffering from back pain, daily headaches, and migraine headaches approximately 3 times per week. He described his pain as an “unbearable everyday occurrence.” Additionally, several days after the accident he began experiencing “blackouts,” which were later diagnosed as petit mal seizures. These seizures continued to increase until he was experiencing them 4 times per day.

Things continued to get worse for the young man as during the first 6 months following the accident, he started experiencing the onset of depression. He described a complete loss of appetite, extreme lethargy, a lack of concern for himself, and an extremely erratic sleep cycle that often left him awake for several days followed by periods of 14 to 18 hours of sleep.

The patient and his mother reported that he consulted with approximately 24 practitioners during this time. Prescribed medications and therapies did not alleviate or reduce symptoms. To alleviate his pain and depression, he started using illegal drugs in an attempt to “make himself feel better.” After becoming addicted, his parents checked him into a drug rehabilitation program, which he completed.

It was after this long and horrifying 6 year period, that this young man sought chiropractic care from the chiropractor who authored the published study. An examination was performed and it was determined that the young man was suffering due to a subluxation in the upper neck. A course of corrective adjustments was begun to correct the subluxation and reduce nerve pressure.

The results as reported in the Journal was nothing short of life changing for the young man. After 1 month of care, the patient reported an absence of seizures and manic episodes and improved sleep patterns. After 4 months of care, seizures and manic episodes remained absent and migraine headaches were reduced from 3 per week to 2 per month. After 7 months of care, the patient reported the complete absence of symptoms. And eighteen months later, the patient remains asymptomatic. This has changed his life tremendously.

http://www.chiropracticresearch.org/search-result.php?aid=1092

Tylenol Or Ibuprofen Can Have Ill Affects On Lung Function

We all want to be out of pain.  A quick fix is to pop a pill and the pain will go away. Unfortunately, each time we tack a pill, it affects our body more than just taking pain away.

Below is information that shows affects that pain killers have on the whole body as a system, not as a symptom.

Acetaminophen (Tylenol) Use Associated with Asthma, and Decreased Lung Function:  An article published on May 3, 2005 Medical News Today reported a study that showed that Acetaminophen, more commonly known as Tylenol, if used daily was associated with a greater prevalence of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as well as directly related to decreased lung function. The original study was published in the May 1st 2005 issue of the American Thoracic Society’s peer-reviewed American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Researchers from Britain looked at data from a US survey involving 13,492 participants who were part of the Third National Health and Nutrition Survey which took place from 1988 to 1994. Participants in the survey were asked whether they had taken aspirin, acetaminophen, and ibuprofen during the previous month. The replies to the survey were then divided into “never users;” “occasional users” (1 to 5 times in the past month); “regular users” (6 to 29 times during the past month); and “daily users” (more than 29 times during the last month). This information was then compared to see if there was a correlation.

The researchers found that those who reported daily use of acetaminophen were nearly twice as likely as non-users to have asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. They noted that the results also showed that neither the use of aspirin nor the use of ibuprofen was associated with the prevalence of either asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Researchers also noted that there was a direct relationship between an increase in asthma and a decrease in lung function, with an increased usage of acetaminophen.

In the published report researchers concluded; “This study provides further evidence that use of acetaminophen is associated with an increased risk of asthma and COPD, and with decreased lung function.” They noted that acetaminophen use can cause an increase in asthma risk with potential effects on the onset, progression, and severity of the disease.

http://www.chiropracticresearch.org/search-result.php?aid=1272

Chiropractic Is Cost? Is it expensive?

According to the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

Low back pain initiated with a doctor of chiropractic (DC) saves 40 percent on health care costs when compared with care initiated through a medical doctor (MD), according to a study that analyzed data from 85,000 Blue Cross Blue Shield (BCBS) beneficiaries in Tennessee over a two-year span. The study population had open access to MDs and DCs through self-referral, and there were no limits applied to the number of MD/DC visits allowed and no differences in co-pays. Researchers estimated that allowing DC-initiated episodes of care would have led to an annual cost savings of $2.3 million for BCBS of Tennessee. They also concluded that insurance companies that restrict access to chiropractic care for low back pain treatment may inadvertently pay more for care than they would if they removed such restrictions.

– Liliedahl et al (2010), Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

“Chiropractic care appeared relatively cost-effective for the treatment of chronic low-back pain. Chiropractic and medical care performed comparably for acute patients. Practice-based clinical outcomes were consistent with systematic reviews of spinal manipulative efficacy: manipulation-based therapy is at least as good as and, in some cases, better than other therapeusis.”

– Haas et al (2005), Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

ADHD And Chiropractic… It Works!

FROM:   J Manipulative Physiol Ther 2004 (Oct);   27 (8):   e14 Bastecki AV, Harrison DE, Haas JW


OBJECTIVE: To discuss the case of a patient who was diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) by a general practitioner and was treated with chiropractic care.

CLINICAL FEATURES: A 5-year-old patient was diagnosed with ADHD and treated by a pediatrician unsuccessfully with methylphenidate (Ritalin), Adderall, and Haldol for 3 years. The patient received 35 chiropractic treatments during the course of 8 weeks. A change from a 12 degrees C2-7 kyphosis to a 32 degrees C2-7 lordosis was observed after treatment. During chiropractic care, the child’s facial tics resolved and his behavior vastly improved. After 27 chiropractic visits, the child’s pediatrician stated that the child no longer exhibited symptoms of ADHD. The changes in structure and function may be related to the correction of cervical kyphosis.

CONCLUSION: The patient experienced significant reduction in symptoms. Additionally, the medical doctor concluded that the reduction in symptoms was significant enough to discontinue the medication. There may be a possible connection that correction of cervical kyphosis in patients with ADHD may produce a desirable clinical outcome.

From the Full-Text Article:

Discussion

There exists in the current biomedical literature an ideal cervical spinal model, [17] which was used as a goal of care in this case study. It is generally known in neurosciences and anatomy that the central nervous system is the master control system of the human body. It controls and coordinates all body and cellular functions. When we look at the literature today, there has been a significant amount of information published about the mechanical forces and tension placed on the spinal structures and cord tracts in various postures. [25-36]

Breig [26] showed the changes in spinal cord biomechanics from abnormal postural positions. We propose that these changes in spinal canal and thus spinal cord position can cause such pathologic states as edema, hypoxia, blood loss, and cellular death. [28-36] It has been reported by some researchers that abnormal putamen and lenticular magnetic resonance imaging and positron-emission tomography have been observed in children with ADHD. [37, 38] The previous refrences [28-36] may give insight to these abnormal scans. The underlying cause of the mechanical and thus physiologic changes in the spinal cord, brainstem, and higher brain centers are related to the abnormal static postural positions of the skull relative to the thorax. [26]

Mechanical compression of nerves can result in microvascular permeability changes in the endoneural capillaries and lead to neural edema and changes in impulse propagation. [28-36] Additionally, it has been shown that gradual decompression of nerve roots can restore the intrinsic blood flow. [36] Because the parents reported no other major traumatic injuries to the child other than a difficult birth, we propose that the cause of the abnormal spinal configuration was a result of difficult labor. Because of the vast amount of information concerning abnormal nerve function caused by mechanical stress in neck flexion (kyphosis), [26, 39, 40-45] it stands to reason, because his neck configuration was kyphotic, that the child’s nervous system was not functioning properly. Through the restoration of normal biomechanical structure and curvature, these abnormal stresses and strains were removed from the cord, which led to the improvement in function.

There exists a large amount of literature on ADHD. This literature is generally pharmacologic and behavioral in nature. Many theories of causality and subsequent treatment have been put forth. However, because chiropractors are not authorized in most states to prescribe drugs, the pharmacologic information has little bearing for chiropractors. The chiropractors who treat patients with ADHD should, however, familiarize themselves with the current diagnostic and treatment protocols used by physicians. Medication may have an effect on treatment outcomes and may be an important factor in proper management of this condition. [1-15] It should be noted that these references are nowhere near a complete review of the literature on ADHD.

It is possible that the farther we move from the Harrison ideal spinal model, [17] the greater the neurologic stress from abnormal stress and strain on the spinal cord. [26] Restoring the cervical lordosis could be the most critical aspect of any chiropractic care protocol or clinical intervention. With specific mirror image adjusting, mirror image traction, and mirror image postural exercise, cervical curve restoration is now a possible outcome. [18-21]

Several limitations of this study include: (1) a possibility that there was spontaneous remission of the ADHD symptoms and that chiropractic care had no relevance to the symptom remission; (2) the patient may have been misdiagnosed by the medical doctor; and (3) the patient’s parents may not have been reporting the retrospective symptoms accurately, giving a false sense of improvement. Because this is a case report, further research is needed to determine the true effects of CBP protocol on patients suffering with ADHD.

Conclusion
This case study shows that spinal correction using the CBP approach may have effects much greater than relief of musculoskeletal conditions. Altered spinal biomechanics associated with abnormal posture clearly relate to significant neurological stress and malfunction. This is particularly evident when considering the effects on the brainstem and the autonomic nervous system.

http://www.journals.elsevierhealth.com/periodicals/ymmt/article/PIIS0161475404001642/fulltext

Whiplash And Chiropractic, what to do after a car accident?

Whiplash is an injury to the cervical spine (neck).  In a whiplash injury the joints between the spinal bones (vertebrae), discs, muscles, ligaments and nerves may be irritated or damaged.

When does whiplash occur?
Whiplash is commonly seen with car accidents but it can happen in any case where a person is hit from behind.  This can be from sports or even if someone playfully pushes you from behind a little too hard.

Symptoms of whiplash can happen within a two week period.  It doesn’t necessarily happen right after the incident.  Pain in neck, arm, hand and/or shoulders is common.  Limited neck movement, swelling, stiffness, dizziness, ringing in the ears, blurred vision, concentration or memory difficulty, insomnia may also occur.

How do you know if you have whiplash?
Most of the time you will have discomfort and not be able to move properly.  After car accidents it is common to take an X-ray.  It will show the bone positions in the neck and soft tissue swelling in the neck.   After a car accident it is common for most hospitals to take a CT Scan or MRI to see if there is any serious soft tissue or cervical disc damage.

How can whiplash be helped?
Well, first the swelling needs to be diminished.  Ice packs help this problem tremendously.  Then after the swelling is down, we can start working with getting the scar tissue and damage in the soft tissues of the neck repaired and functioning properly.  Gentle adjustments to the neck allow the neck to keep its curve and move without promoting more damage.  During treatment, exercised to strengthen the neck are performed.

In the past cervical collars were immediately put on patients after a car accident.  This is not recommended unless there is a severe injury with a lot of instability in the neck.  Normally, if a collar is worn and there is no severe damage, the muscles and ligaments in the neck weaken and this can promote further injury.

We have helped several patients that have come in with whiplash.  Soft tissue repair and neck adjustments can get you back to normal.  Just because you have a car accident and were hurt doesn’t mean you have to live your life in pain and dysfunction.  We can help!

Call our office today!

Precise Moves Chiropractic
Redwood City, CA
650-353-1133

What natural remedy works great for Cold Sores?

Ever have a canker sore? Here are a few natural ways to reduce pain and help heal your canker sore without synthetic medication or surgery:

  • Tannin
    Tannin is found in Black tea
  • Mouth wash
    Mix together 2 ounces of hydrogen peroxide, 2 teaspoonfuls of salt and 1 teaspoonful of baking soda and swirl it around your mouth for about 1 minute. Spit it out. Don’t swallow.
  • Aloe Vera
    Aloe Vera juice a few times a day will help make the sore less painful
  • Onion
    Apply a raw onion to the canker sore
  • Papaya
    Suck on some papaya
  • Plum Juice
    2 table spoons of plum juice and soak a cotton ball in the fluid. Compress it over your sore for a few minutes
  • Soda
    A cupful of warm soda and a pinch of salt
  • Grapefruit Seed
    Extract of grapefruit seed is a disinfectant and after a few applications, it should be gone!

Cold Sore diet suggestions

Here is advice for a Cold Sore Diet:

Avoid: Acidic and salty foods. Chocolates, peanuts, grains, peas, seeds, oatmeal and whole-wheat are high in arginine, These are restricted. Avoid tea and coffee.

Do Eat: A vitamin enriched diet. Your diet must include vitamin A, C, E, Zinc, and iron.  Garlic is highly recommended in your diet. Eat fresh food with high antioxidants  and high complex carbohydrates. Avoid processed food. Eat lots of fruits and green leafy vegetables.

This and other helpful information is all part our treatment plans.  We help with more than just pain, we help the whole body function optimally and help you do the things in life that you want to do.  Call our Redwood City Chiropractic office today! (650) 353-1133

Thumb And Wrist Can Be A Real Pain!

Pain can really put a damper on things.  One big “pain” in the upper extremity is called De Quervain’s tenosynovitis.  It is inflammation of the tendons near your thumb. This can be quite painful and you’re likely to feel pulling and pain every time you move your wrist or try to grip or make a fist.  It can prevent you from working or doing the things at home that you love.  Pain occurs when inflammation occurs around the thumb and makes if uncomfortable to move.  If so, ice can be used to take the inflammation down but the problem will come back unless you find a solution to what is making the thumb swell.

This injury can happen because of repetitive work movements, sports, cooking.  Even musicians can start getting pain because of the repetitive movements while playing an instrument.

Treatment normally can take four to six weeks, but can sometimes be longer if your job requires you to continue to do repetitive movements of the wrist and hand.

If you have tried drugs, wrist braces and ice and it still hurts, you may want to call our Redwood City Chiropractor for an appointment.  We can help.